Hobson's Choice (Millard example)

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Jim Eshelman
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Hobson's Choice (Millard example)

Post by Jim Eshelman » Thu May 25, 2023 6:43 pm

Mary Elizabeth, Aug 30, 1977, 10:36 PM EDT, Portland, ME
Died Sep 10, 1977, 10:01 PM
Dr. Millard wrote:This is the story of Mary Elizabeth, born prematurely by Caesarian section... She had excellent medical care... but the medical considerations led to a birth at a time which was disastrous, not only for Mary Elizabeth, but also for her mother, who will never be able to have another child...

Mary Elizabeth was about two months premature and weighed one kilogram [2.2 lb.] when she was hastily delivered that night. The mother had reported that her movements were less well felt than they had been... the C-section was an emergency. There was not even time to inject the mother with cortisone to try to induced the enzyme which causes the lungs to produce surfactant. Unless this is done and surfactant can be produced, a two pound infant born prematurely by C-section is almost certain to have hyaline membrane disease.

Mary Elizabeth in fact had this disease, which used to be almost always fatal... Now that ventilators have been improved, and attention is paid to important matters such as the oxygen saturation and pH of the blood, survival has risen to 30% in neonatal intensive care units.

Mary Elizabeth seemed to be doing quite well for a few days, then her platelets feel to dangerously low levels... she began to bleed. What apparently had happened was that either hypoxia or acidosis had set in motion a process of internal clotting of the blood, and the platelets had been used up... Mary Elizabeth had a condition which is known as disseminated intravascular coagulation, because the components of the blood which are necessary for clotting are used up. Until they are replaced, the blood will remain fluid.

She was given a transfusion of fresh frozen plasma and packed red blood cells. The danger in being born too soon always lies in the lungs... The lungs became stiff and resistant to expansion because of the bleeding problem. [Treatment followed.] Finally... the ventilator was not able to oxygenate her body, and on September 10th, when she was eleven days old, she finally died.
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Re: Hobson's Choice (Millard example)

Post by Jim Eshelman » Thu May 25, 2023 6:59 pm

My analysis: I'm having difficulties with these charts that have conditions already existing at birth, in contrast to citing vulnerabilities that might occur later in life. Let's take a crack at this anyway.

The bottom line is: She was born two months prematurely under conditions that usually result in infant respiratory distress syndrome. Either the natural course of this condition or some other process caused her platelets to drop precipitously, which further damaged the lungs. Eventually, doctors couldn't keep her lungs pumping and she died.

Sun is middleground, so vitality was probably average. Uranus was closely angular. A Venus-Pluto mundane square was moderately-to-distantly foreground (which I would not expect to affect health). Moon is in Pisces (abdomen) and Mars in Gemini (legs; but see below).

The only non-foreground close hard aspects are Sun-Mercury conjunction in Leo (2°56'M, background) and a Mars-Jupiter conjunction in Gemini (2°16', middleground). For Sun-Mercury, I expect nervous system concerns; I don't think it would affect breathing, especially without afflictions. Mars-Jupiter is interesting, though. First, it's in Gemini, which normally rules the legs but (by 'reflex' Gemini-Sagittarius action) can affect the lungs. I'd say that in someone of potentially vulnerable to serious lung affliction, in the absence of other indicators, a non-foreground hard aspect in Gemini deserves attention. Since Mars is inflammation (and connected to the blood, especially the iron-bearing part of the blood) and Jupiter with the ability to expand, this might be a relevant aspect.
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Re: Hobson's Choice (Millard example)

Post by Jim Eshelman » Thu May 25, 2023 7:08 pm

Jim Eshelman wrote:
Thu May 25, 2023 6:43 pm
Mary Elizabeth, Aug 30, 1977, 10:36 PM EDT, Portland, ME
Died Sep 10, 1977, 10:01 PM
When she died, MC and Ascendant were nearly identical to when she was born. Transits were sufficient:

11°13' Pis - r Moon
11°41' Gem - t Mars

13°09' Leo - r Sun
13°28' Leo - t Mercury
(Not sure what this one means.)

Her SNQ was interesting: The obviously correct indication for respiratory failure was SNQ Asc 18°54' Tau opposite natal and transiting Neptunes (natal was 18°57' Sco). Less obvious was transiting Venus 21°37' Cancer 0°15' from SNQ IC. It was a Venus-Neptune co-angularity.

Being born 11-days-old means she had just had her first 10-Day Solar. The chart 6:07 AM on the day she died with Sun rising and Neptune on IC: a partile Sun-Neptune mundane aspect. The NLR occurred early afternoon and had Neptune rising. Neptune was clearly the signal of the final respiratory death.
Jim Eshelman
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